sustainability

Penultimate Review

On Wednesday, April 1st we had our penultimate review.  Bill Martella, James Rose, and Matt Culver were our reviewers and gave us a great critique and great advice that we have already started to implement into our design. This review covered the previous semester’s work with green oak, the site and context, program, research, living […]

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Exterior Mockup

  We have one more building mockup completed!  This time we’re looking at how the green oak cants can be used as siding on a building.  With this 1:1 scale mockup, we’re investigating the weathering capabilities of 5/8” thick boards and the fasteners that are used to attach them.  This mockup will use stainless steel […]

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Off To The Hardwood Mill!

I recently took a trip to pick up a batch of freshly cut oak cants for our next building mock-up.  Because cants aren’t available in a typical home improvement store, I had to go right to the source: the sawmill.  I took our big UT  Motor pool truck down to Seymour, TN and paid the East Tennessee Wood Products Company, […]

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Phase II

A new phase for the Green Oak Initiative. A new semester. A new team. Since winning the U.S. EPA Sustainable Design Challenge, we have $90,000 in grant funding for a real-world application. After Phase I’s success we can now continue to design and build a full scale building in Phase II. The primary objectives in […]

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Proposed Designs

Our team studied different variations for a proposed house design. We integrated these projects into our Phase 2 proposal. Here are the three drawing sets that we brought to Washington DC: Team A Team B Team C

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Closer Look at our Final Board

If you did not get a chance to view our final presentation up close, here is another look at it. You may also download it here: Green Oak Presentation

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Eben-Ezer Medical Clinic Addition

FROM THE OUTSIDE-IN: to maximize cooling within the buildings, waiting spaces for patients and their families occur in outdoor courtyards and covered areas. Further waiting for children, families, and patients alike may also occur below the mango trees planted throughout the campus. By keeping patients and families on the outside, security and sanitation are maximized […]

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