Green Oak Construction

Dates: 2012 – Present
Location: TBD
Project Leaders: Ted Shelton and Robert French
Partners: US EPA, UT Center for Renewable Carbon

The Green Oak Initiative is a proposal by the University of Tennessee to develop contemporary green (un-dried) oak construction techniques for the US building market. Because many of the “heart-centers” of hardwood logs have defects that limit their usefulness for traditional dry lumber products, this portion of the log is routinely sold green (un-dried) as “cants” used to manufacture shipping pallets – an extremely low-grade use for such an otherwise highly desirable resource. This initiative will allow currently underutilized heart-centers of logs to be used as an extremely low energy, carbon friendly, beautiful and high value wood product for structural members in sustainable buildings. The research found will be applied to a comprehensive “green” demonstration project for a UT extension 4-H camp complex in West Tennessee.


Project Blog

(View The Full Green Oak Construction Blog)

Penultimate Review

Dates: 2012 – Present Location: TBD Project Leaders: Ted Shelton and Robert French Partners: US EPA, UT Center for Renewable […]

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Exterior Mockup

Dates: 2012 – Present Location: TBD Project Leaders: Ted Shelton and Robert French Partners: US EPA, UT Center for Renewable […]

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Off To The Hardwood Mill!

Dates: 2012 – Present Location: TBD Project Leaders: Ted Shelton and Robert French Partners: US EPA, UT Center for Renewable […]

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Green Oak Seminar Class

Dates: 2012 – Present Location: TBD Project Leaders: Ted Shelton and Robert French Partners: US EPA, UT Center for Renewable […]

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EPA P3 Competition

The Appalachian hardwood region is one of the most productive forests in the world, annually adding about twice the volume of timber to its reserve as is harvested, despite supporting a robust industry of diverse, high-value hardwood products such as flooring, trim, and cabinetry. The “heart centers” of hardwood logs, however, are an exception to the efficient use of this resource. Because this wood has defects that limit its usefulness for traditional dry lumber products, this portion of the log is routinely sold green (un-dried) as “cants” used to manufacture shipping pallets – an extremely low-grade use for such an otherwise highly desirable resource.